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State legislators from Sumner County defended the tax cuts given by Gov. Sam Brownback, and said they believe they will end up helping the state, as they spoke at a legislative update meeting held at the Donut Shop in Wellington Saturday.

State legislators from Sumner County defended the tax cuts given by Gov. Sam Brownback, and said they believe they will end up helping the state, as they spoke at a legislative update meeting held at the Donut Shop in Wellington Saturday.

'Any law that denies the right to vote...is a bad law'

WICHITA — The fight over a voter proof-of-citizenship law that prevented about 22,000 Kansas residents from casting ballots on Election Day has shifted back to state courts and lawmakers.

When lawmakers assemble in Topeka in January, they will have to drastically cut spending or raise taxes. Or both. It’s unavoidable.

Republican legislators have already begun dividing into two camps about how to solve the state’s budget woes, foretelling a fight that’ll play out within the party that controls both the Kansas House and Senate.

Kansas must cut $279 million from its budget before July just to be dead broke with a balance of zero in its checking account.

The third in our four-part series on reading in the Common Core era.

Every set of academic standards has a soul.

Yes, a soul. It's made of varied stuff: part research, part practice, part conviction of its authors.

To find the soul, follow the words that turn up again and again in the winding backwaters and byways of the standards themselves.

A search of the Common Core English Language Arts Standards turns up one remarkable word 105 times. It is "complex" (or "complexity").

Part 2 in a four-part series on reading in the Common Core era.

Linnea Wolters was prepared to hate the Common Core State Standards.

She taught fifth grade at a low-income school in Reno, Nev., where, she says, there was always some new plan to improve things. And none of it added up to good education. But, after leading her class through a Core-aligned lesson — a close reading of Emma Lazarus' sonnet "The New Colossus" — she was intrigued, especially by the way different students reacted to the process.

Part 1 in a 4-part series on reading in the Common-Core era.

The Common Core State Standards are changing what many kids read in school. They're standards, sure — not curriculum. Teachers and districts still have great latitude when it comes to the "how" of reading instruction, but...

TOPEKA - The state of Kansas will not have enough money to pay its bills through June unless it cuts $279 million in spending, according to updated revenue estimates.

Just a week after being re-elected, Gov. Sam Brownback is staring down a budget crisis, and nonpartisan analysts point to his signature policy as the cause.

Budget director Shawn Sullivan had the unenviable chore of presenting the state’s dire fiscal outlook at a news conference Monday evening at the Capitol. The state must cut $279 million for the current fiscal year, which ends in June, and another $436 million in the next fiscal year.

The estimates were made by the Consensus Estimating Group, which meets every six months and includes the budget director, officials from the Department of Revenue and the state’s Legislative Research Department.

Legislators tried to pass law in 2013, but Brownback vetoed it

Kansas has legalized charity fundraising raffles.

Voters approved an amendment to the state constitution in Tuesday’s election. The measure allows nonprofit, religious, veterans and other organizations to hold raffles as fundraisers.

But organizations won’t be allowed to sell raffle tickets through electronic gambling or vending machines or contract with professional lottery or raffle companies to operate their contests.

Janet Waugh, of KCK, is one of just two Democrats on the board

The Kansas State Board of Education will retain its moderate tone for the next two years after the Kansas City incumbent won re-election in the board's sole contested race.

Janet Waugh, one of just two Democrats on the 10-person body, faced a challenge from Republican Nancy Klemp, president of the Leavenworth USD 453 school board, who likely would have strengthened the board's conservative contingent.

Waugh took 53 percent of the vote.

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