While the claim --- total education dollars for Kansas school districts are rising --- is technically accurate, it is also true that K12 classrooms have less funds to meet today's increasing education standards.
How so?
• Enrollment changes and the rate of inflation out pace state budget increases, especially for operating budgets
• Back pay for the state's unfunded pension obligations is among the largest fund increase, devoting dollars to areas that cannot be used for classroom instruction.

Click each picture to open the full size PDF version.


TOPEKA  - A bill that would make major changes in how the state pays for schools could become law as early as the end of this week.
 

New bill targets science and AP curriculums, as well

Kansas lawmakers are making a third attempt at unraveling the state's standards for teaching math, English, science, and other subjects, after failing to pass similar bills the past two years.

In the second week of the 2015 legislative session, the Senate education panel has received a tweaked version of previous efforts to scuttle the state's teaching guidelines for those subjects.

The bill, introduced Thursday, would force Kansas to revert on July 1 to the standards it used before 2010.

Governor’s Bold Budget Proposal Provides $0 for K12 School Funding Ruling


The governor’s budget proposal addresses a $648 million shortfall by cutting services, raising sales taxes and rejecting the $550 plus million court ruling that K12 public schools have been chronically underfunded for years.  

This is a great read on the tactics in play to destroy public education. Please take the time to read the full blog...

If I wanted to design an education budget that gives the “appearance” of supporting teachers and educators, what would that budget look like? What if my long term goals are to get the state out of the education business and turn that entire enterprise over to the private sector? How can I continue to “starve” public education to achieve this goal? Here’s what I might do.

Governor, Legislature face ongoing litigation over whether school funding is too low

Gov. Sam Brownback’s proposal to scrap the state’s K-12 funding formula has sparked speculation about whether he is trying to skirt an ongoing lawsuit — questions that his office declined to answer on Monday.

Gov. Sam Brownback endorsed remaking how the state funds public schools and putting the state’s creditors at the front of the line for payments from state coffers in an ambitious State of the State speech Thursday night. He also embraced moving city elections to the fall and changing the way Kansas selects its Supreme Court justices....

2015 Kansas Legislative Session is Away

This second week in January marks the opening of the 2015 legislative session, completed by the Governor’s State of the State address Thursday and his budget recommendations Friday (Transcript for Gov. Brownback’s address , Transcript for Sen. Hensley’s response).  

In brief – this will be a tough year for Kansas public school patrons, who include 85% of all families with school-aged children.  We encourage you to keep three things in mind throughout this legislation session:    

Budget director says adjustments necessary to structurally balance budget

Gov. Sam Brownback’s administration outlined a sweeping budget plan Friday that includes changes to Medicaid and increases in the state’s tobacco and alcohol taxes.

Pages

While the claim --- total education dollars for Kansas school districts are rising --- is technically accurate, it is also true that K12 classrooms have less funds to meet today's increasing education standards.
How so?
• Enrollment changes and the rate of inflation out pace state budget increases, especially for operating budgets
• Back pay for the state's unfunded pension obligations is among the largest fund increase, devoting dollars to areas that cannot be used for classroom instruction.

Click each picture to open the full size PDF version.


TOPEKA  - A bill that would make major changes in how the state pays for schools could become law as early as the end of this week.
 

New bill targets science and AP curriculums, as well

Kansas lawmakers are making a third attempt at unraveling the state's standards for teaching math, English, science, and other subjects, after failing to pass similar bills the past two years.

In the second week of the 2015 legislative session, the Senate education panel has received a tweaked version of previous efforts to scuttle the state's teaching guidelines for those subjects.

The bill, introduced Thursday, would force Kansas to revert on July 1 to the standards it used before 2010.

Governor’s Bold Budget Proposal Provides $0 for K12 School Funding Ruling


The governor’s budget proposal addresses a $648 million shortfall by cutting services, raising sales taxes and rejecting the $550 plus million court ruling that K12 public schools have been chronically underfunded for years.  

This is a great read on the tactics in play to destroy public education. Please take the time to read the full blog...

If I wanted to design an education budget that gives the “appearance” of supporting teachers and educators, what would that budget look like? What if my long term goals are to get the state out of the education business and turn that entire enterprise over to the private sector? How can I continue to “starve” public education to achieve this goal? Here’s what I might do.

Governor, Legislature face ongoing litigation over whether school funding is too low

Gov. Sam Brownback’s proposal to scrap the state’s K-12 funding formula has sparked speculation about whether he is trying to skirt an ongoing lawsuit — questions that his office declined to answer on Monday.

Gov. Sam Brownback endorsed remaking how the state funds public schools and putting the state’s creditors at the front of the line for payments from state coffers in an ambitious State of the State speech Thursday night. He also embraced moving city elections to the fall and changing the way Kansas selects its Supreme Court justices....

2015 Kansas Legislative Session is Away

This second week in January marks the opening of the 2015 legislative session, completed by the Governor’s State of the State address Thursday and his budget recommendations Friday (Transcript for Gov. Brownback’s address , Transcript for Sen. Hensley’s response).  

In brief – this will be a tough year for Kansas public school patrons, who include 85% of all families with school-aged children.  We encourage you to keep three things in mind throughout this legislation session:    

Budget director says adjustments necessary to structurally balance budget

Gov. Sam Brownback’s administration outlined a sweeping budget plan Friday that includes changes to Medicaid and increases in the state’s tobacco and alcohol taxes.

Pages