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Governor calls for reform of the school finance funding formula

Gov. Sam Brownback defended cutting contributions to state worker retirement plans Wednesday — a necessary step, he argued, to protect education spending — as he called for an overhaul of the state’s school finance formula.

Ron Estes dismayed by cuts to KPERS funding

One of the state’s top elected officials announced concern over Gov. Sam Brownback’s proposal to scale back state pension funds to shore up holes in the state budget.

Following the governor’s announcement Tuesday of his plan to transfer $40.7 million from the state’s pension plan for general expenses, Kansas State Treasurer Ron Estes called for alternatives.

Administration announces allotment plan

Expenditures by state agencies will be cut by 4 percent to make up for an expected revenue shortfall, Gov. Sam Brownback’s administration said Tuesday.

The governor’s office announced allotments to deal with a $279 million revenue shortfall expected for the remainder of the fiscal year, which runs until July.

According to documents posted on the state budget website, general revenue-funded state agencies, such as the Department of Labor and the Department for Children and Families will see a 4 percent expenditure reduction.

A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit last week that alleges Kansas' science standards violate the religious freedoms of students and parents and promote atheism.

The Next Generation Science Standards, which were adopted by the Kansas State Board of Education last year, include evolution and climate change as key scientific concepts that should be taught from kindergarten to 12th grade.

State legislators from Sumner County defended the tax cuts given by Gov. Sam Brownback, and said they believe they will end up helping the state, as they spoke at a legislative update meeting held at the Donut Shop in Wellington Saturday.

State legislators from Sumner County defended the tax cuts given by Gov. Sam Brownback, and said they believe they will end up helping the state, as they spoke at a legislative update meeting held at the Donut Shop in Wellington Saturday.

'Any law that denies the right to vote...is a bad law'

WICHITA — The fight over a voter proof-of-citizenship law that prevented about 22,000 Kansas residents from casting ballots on Election Day has shifted back to state courts and lawmakers.

When lawmakers assemble in Topeka in January, they will have to drastically cut spending or raise taxes. Or both. It’s unavoidable.

Republican legislators have already begun dividing into two camps about how to solve the state’s budget woes, foretelling a fight that’ll play out within the party that controls both the Kansas House and Senate.

Kansas must cut $279 million from its budget before July just to be dead broke with a balance of zero in its checking account.

The third in our four-part series on reading in the Common Core era.

Every set of academic standards has a soul.

Yes, a soul. It's made of varied stuff: part research, part practice, part conviction of its authors.

To find the soul, follow the words that turn up again and again in the winding backwaters and byways of the standards themselves.

A search of the Common Core English Language Arts Standards turns up one remarkable word 105 times. It is "complex" (or "complexity").

Part 2 in a four-part series on reading in the Common Core era.

Linnea Wolters was prepared to hate the Common Core State Standards.

She taught fifth grade at a low-income school in Reno, Nev., where, she says, there was always some new plan to improve things. And none of it added up to good education. But, after leading her class through a Core-aligned lesson — a close reading of Emma Lazarus' sonnet "The New Colossus" — she was intrigued, especially by the way different students reacted to the process.

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